Content, context, discontent and disconnect…

Websites, they’re still important, pundits opine that we’re seeing the death of the traditional homepage, that social media are now effectively the route for people to find our inspirational content but it’s rare these days that we arrive at a business meeting without our prospect having a pretty good idea of who we are, what we do, where we sit and they’ll have formed that opinion based on our web presence.

It’s tempting, as social media becomes the focus of marketing fashion to treat the classic website as an online brochure, a project for the intern or a must-have that just needs maintenance. But we’d suggest that’s not a good idea.

It’s very easy to create a website “they” say, and “they’re” right.

It’s easy to pop into WordPress and grab a template and add some words,cobbled together from your latest brochure, to stick a couple of images up, to make something that looks ok, and so very, many folk do just that.

I’m not advocating spending a fortune on the highly skilled HTML buffs in the pay of the multitude of increasing desperate web agencies, I am however pointing out the pitfalls, three in all, of this DIY approach.

1. There are people who find spelling errors, poor grammar and a casual approach to the language a turn-off, they might be potential customers, but you’ll never know that they’ve discovered a split infinitive, and they’ve split.

2. Content is increasingly the lure that brings people to your website,to any website, they’re looking for something of value and you’re looking to give them something of value, something fresh, they’re not enthused by that three-year-old case study or your turgid white paper explaining your thinking of last year that the cloud is a no-go area for smart businesses.So you have to keep it fresh, current and valuable, and that takes time, effort and a quality approach to content production.

3. Same old, Same old. Few of us are lucky enough to be gifted creative thinkers, no matter what our mum had stuck on the fridge, we’re not as good as specialists and we’re not keeping up to speed with the latest developments in user involvement and retention.

I’m not saying that using WordpScreen Shot 2014-06-04 at 15.18.18ress or Blogger as your weapon of choice is wrong, au contraire, there’s a lot of functionality built in, not least in terms of search engine optimisation but I do advocate a couple of things:

Firstly, involving an objective creative eye, a third party, a good graphic designer to spend a few days making it look good.
Secondly, if you’re not one of those unfortunates who can’t read past a misplaced colon: find a professional proofreader or gifted pedant and ask them to review your words.

I’m not advocating sticking lipstick on a pig, I am saying, quality matters, and it’s often worth investing in those who can ensure that you present yourself, your business, your clients and the work you do for them, in the best possible light.

I’m now going to sit back and see how many errors the internet grammar police can find in this epistle and the Adara websites, fair enough, bring it on.

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